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Posts Tagged ‘creative process’

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“The unborn work in the psyche of the artist is a force of nature… The creative urge lives and grows … like a tree in the earth… We could do well, therefore, to think of the creative process as a living thing implanted in the human psyche.”

C.G. Jung (CW 15, par. 115)

I have been struggling to find a voice with which to write longer works. I realize that this struggle is deeply imbedded in my wanting to be open to the creative process and how this wanting gets in the way of creativity. I need to let the tree grow from the earth and not force the process. I also realize there is a struggle within me between the poet and the scientist. The poet wants to live in the mystery of life and be immersed in experience. The scientist wants to understand the meaning of life events. This dichotomy between heart and head often creates a roadblock within me. How do I hold these two parts of myself in a co-creative way? Jung was well aware of this dilemma both personally and professionally as a psychologist. Here is what he (CW 15, par. 121) says about this struggle between wanting to know and living in the mystery:

We must interpret, we must find meanings in things, otherwise we would be quite unable to think about them. We have to break down life and events, which are self-contained processes, into meanings, images, concepts, well-knowing that in doing so we are getting further away from the living mystery.

We feel compelled to understand what life presents us and for those of us inclined to science, this means ‘breaking down’ the experience. Yet in the moment of analyzing the thing, the mystery is lost. Jung goes on to say:

As long as we ourselves are caught up in the process of creation, we neither see nor understand; indeed we ought not to understand, for nothing is more injurious to immediate experience than cognition. But for the purpose of cognitive understanding we must detach ourselves from the creative process and look at it from the outside; only then does it become an image that expresses what we are bound to call ‘meaning.’

So, we are caught between being in the midst of the creative process and wanting to understand it. Jung states that our cognitive approach is ‘injurious to the immediate experience’ of the creative process. It seems that he is suggesting that it is best to dwell in the experience, i.e. be a full participant in the experience, and only then look back with a cognitive gaze to find meaning. This way we give both heart and head their due.

Giving heart and head their due has become a challenging path for me. I hope to walk this path more often in the future.

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